Pureland Pictures

Daddy Don't Go

   

 

Daddy Don't Go

Captured over two years, “Daddy Don’t Go” is a feature length documentary about four disadvantaged fathers in New York City as they struggle to beat the odds and defy the deadbeat dad stereotype. The film was Executive Produced by the actors/activists Omar Epps and Malik Yoba and has screened at over 35 festivals, winning eight “Best Documentary” awards.

“Daddy Don’t Go” is currently airing on the Starz Network. You can order the film through New Days films here or watch it now on Kanopy. Please fill out our "Host a Screening" form for educational/institutional screening inquiries. 

Daddy Don’t Go” is a stirring film that derives much of its power from its non-judgmental perspective on its subjects…a nuanced and heartrending work.
— Nick Schager, VARIETY 
An effective response to media conversations that too often make the epidemic of absent fathers seem like a simple case of individual choice, Emily Abt’s “Daddy Don’t Go” adds the kind of human perspective that is essential in statistics-based policy debates. Bottom line: this Sympathetic doc offers real-world insight into absent-father epidemic.
— John DeFore, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
Daddy Don’t Go” is garnering attention not only because of its subject matter, but also because of the way it was filmed; Abt followed four fathers for over two years in order to delve into the issues that low-income fathers face. A story of perseverance, it is a film that shows viewers how men can still be present fathers despite having limited means and facing obstacles.
— Elle Lenonsis, INDIEWIRE
Daddy Don’t Go” challenges skeptics and gives otherwise marginalized men the chance to be appreciated for loving, not forgetting about, their seeds.
— Matt Barone, TRIBECA FILM
This new film from director Emily Abt is arguably one of the year’s most touching documentaries. Abt’s film is non-judgemental, instead it offers up four singular stories with a great deal of respect and tenderness given to each respective narrative. It’s an emotional piece of work and needs to be seen.
— Joshua Brunsting, CRITERION